About Symbiosis

Origins

Clive Williamson started Symbiosis in 1987, aiming to combine natural instruments such as flutes (played by himself and John Hackett) and guitars (played by Richard Bolton) with the best in studio technology and a sensitive approach to production. The group then expanded to include cittern and mandolin player Ashley Drees; flautist and singer Emily Sinclair; and a number of guest musicians including Sarah Devonald (oboe and Cor Anglais), Ian Ritchie (soprano sax), Maloviere (violin and tsimbala) and percussionist Michèle Drees. Clive has used both analogue and digital recording methods to capture their performances and creates all their album covers using ‘ambient images’ from nature.

“Our goal has always been to use technology intuitively and creatively, so that our music – and the way we present it – is as natural and as inventive as possible. I think the best use of technology is often when it is completely transparent to our listeners, but has enabled us to make better recordings – with more heart-felt and inspired playing, writing and mixing – than would have been possible using traditional methods!”

John Hackett & Clive Williamson

John & Clive

Clive Williamson & Richard Bolton

Clive & Richard

The group began by providing instrumental music and theme tunes for BBC radio and TV programmes in the UK. Their compositions have since been broadcast in the USA, Australia, and New Zealand and on the BBC’s World Service. Music by Symbiosis was featured in “The Day They Made It Rain”, a BBC documentary which won the Sony Radio Academy Gold Award for Best News Programme in 2002. 

Symbiosis can also be heard on retail projects from the BBC, Longman and best-selling author Denise Linn and they have established their own range of highly successful relaxation music albums in the UK, which are now sold globally through iTunes.

FAQ

Origins

Clive Williamson started Symbiosis in 1987, aiming to combine natural instruments such as flutes (played by himself and John Hackett) and guitars (played by Richard Bolton) with the best in studio technology and a sensitive approach to production.
John Hackett & Clive Williamson

John & Clive

The group expanded to include cittern and mandolin player Ashley Drees; flautist and singer Emily Sinclair; and a number of guest musicians including Sarah Devonald (oboe and Cor Anglais), Ian Ritchie (soprano sax), Maloviere (violin and tsimbala) and percussionist Michèle Drees. Clive has used both analogue and digital recording methods to capture their performances and creates all their album covers using ‘ambient images’ from nature.

Clive Williamson & Richard Bolton

Clive & Richard

“Our goal has always been to use technology intuitively and creatively, so that our music – and the way we present it – is as natural and as inventive as possible. I think the best use of technology is often when it is completely transparent to our listeners, but has enabled us to make better recordings – with more heart-felt and inspired playing, writing and mixing – than would have been possible using traditional methods!”

The group began by providing instrumental music and theme tunes for BBC radio and TV programmes in the UK. Their compositions have since been broadcast in the USA, Australia, and New Zealand and on the BBC’s World Service. Music by Symbiosis was featured in “The Day They Made It Rain”, a BBC documentary which won the Sony Radio Academy Gold Award for Best News Programme in 2002. 

Symbiosis can also be heard on retail projects from the BBC, Longman and best-selling author Denise Linn and they have established their own range of highly successful relaxation music albums in the UK, which are now sold globally through iTunes and cdBaby.

FAQ

Yellow flowers

Who Uses Your Music?

Individuals; therapists and their clients; hospitals; businesses. Symbiosis albums are perfect for Massage, Aromatherapy, Yoga, Meditation and as a background for a wide range of holistic therapies.

Green Leaves

Is your Music all Played on Synthesisers?

No! Our policy is to use natural instruments like flutes or acoustic guitar, blended with delicate keyboard soundscapes.

Autumn leaves

Why are there Few Tunes?

Tunes can prevent really deep relaxation, so our music is usually free-flowing and melodic, allowing listeners to create their own space…

The Science of Relaxation

A study at Kingston University has shown that listening to Symbiosis can reduce the heartbeat rate, and therefore help people to relax. In tests, music from Touching the Clouds was found to be the most successful at reducing the pulse, tying in first place with a slow movement by Vivaldi.

Doctors at St. Bartholomew’s hospital in London have used Symbiosis’s music as part of a study to see if relaxation tapes can be used with – or even instead of – conventional medication to treat some stress-related problems.

Read more.

The artwork for Touching the Clouds by Symbiosis

The Science of Relaxation

A study at Kingston University has shown that listening to Symbiosis can reduce the heartbeat rate, and therefore help people to relax. In tests, music from Touching the Clouds was found to be the most successful at reducing the pulse, tying in first place with a slow movement by Vivaldi.

Doctors at St. Bartholomew’s hospital in London have used Symbiosis’s music as part of a study to see if relaxation tapes can be used with – or even instead of – conventional medication to treat some stress-related problems. Read more.

The artwork for Touching the Clouds by Symbiosis

The Science of Relaxation

A study at Kingston University has shown that listening to Symbiosis can reduce the heartbeat rate, and therefore help people to relax. In tests, music from Touching the Clouds was found to be the most successful at reducing the pulse, tying in first place with a slow movement by Vivaldi.

Doctors at St. Bartholomew’s hospital in London have used Symbiosis’s music as part of a study to see if relaxation tapes can be used with – or even instead of – conventional medication to treat some stress-related problems. Read more.

Symbiosis through the Years

Symbiosis through the Years

Symbiosis support Butterfly Conservation (UK) and Tiritiri Matangi Island (NZ).
All content on this website © Symbiosis Music Ltd, 2000-2019 unless otherwise stated.